How to Become a Corporate Flight Attendant

While on workcation in Texas last week I met a commercial flight attendant. She wanted to know all about how I became a corporate flight attendant and whether I had any advice to share about transitioning into corporate aviation. I’m actually frequently asked this question, so I thought I’d share my experience for any of you who might have the same questions.

How to Become a Corporate Flight Attendant

Let me say I have only ever flown corporate aviation for Clay Lacy Aviation. This is actually quite rare because the majority of flight attendants get their start in commercial aviation. I’ve been flying now for 9 years and I definitely feel blessed and fortunate to have landed in a job that is so perfectly suited to me.

Corporate Flight Attendant Training

Having said that, let me start by saying if you’re looking to get into corporate flight attending, the only two training programs I suggest are by Flight Safety and Aircare. I have attended both training courses and they are the two leading programs in the country.  I’m pretty sure most aircraft operators prefer their Cabin Attendants be certified with one of these programs.  Aircare is great for initial training because they offer the emergency training AND cabin server etiquette & service training.  I recommend researching both companies to determine which course suits your location and individual needs.  As far as pricing, I suggest contacting both programs to get a break down of costs to complete the training. Keep in mind you will need to attend recurrent training every 1-2yrs.  The good news is if you’re hired full time with an aircraft operator they cover your expense for recurrent training.

Corporate Flight Attendant TrainingI know what you really want to know is, how likely is it you will be hired after investing in the training?  I’m going to be honest with you, it is a pretty competitive field.  A lot of companies will not hire you without flight time.  But you never know. Do some research before you jump in and reach out to operators in your area to see if they take on new attendants.  The fact is once you have the “classroom” training done there is the “practical” training.  Meaning part of a typical Cabin Attendant job interview is to demonstrate an actual, albeit simulated meal service to observe your service skills.  Some companies are willing to “train” you as an intern so you can gain some practical skills of the job.

Corporate Flight Attendant Duties and Skills

This job requires you to be able to manage the whole cabin by yourself from city to city & country to country.

Some examples of corporate flight attendant duties and skills include:

  • Training in medical & emergency procedures;
  • Running entertainment and visual systems;
  • Providing all meal service(s) including the washing and maintenance of dishes;
  • “House Keeping” meaning you clean the plane during and after every flight;
  • Occasionally when requested be able to make beds;
  • A broad knowledge of food & sourcing food; and
  • Alcohol and barista knowledge is always a bonus.

Beyond this, I’d say a genuine pleasure for taking care of people is essential. This is a job where you never say “no” or “can’t.” It’s our job to provide 100% whatever a passenger may want. This type of service should not irritate you because that is why passengers fly privately.

Hopefully my directness doesn’t discourage anyone from pursing this amazing career.  I use to train new cabin attendants so I know exactly what happens when the whole truth is not presented up front. I don’t want any of you to be disappointed or disillusioned after investing in training.  It is marvelous career…the best ever…but only if it suits you.  When it doesn’t it can be miserable.

Please, please let me know if you have any other questions about becoming a corporate flight attendant. I am very happy to help!!

7 Comments
  1. Hi Beautiful Tennille! Haven’t seen you in ages. Loved this piece you wrote. Going to pass it on to a girl I know who wants to start flying. Hope all is well. xoxo Cindy Robledo

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